The Art of Failure - A Lesson in Failing Supplements and Being Knocked Unconscious

by Paul Banasiak March 17, 2017 0 Comments

The Art of Failure may become a crucial skill set to aid you throughout your lifetime. Every success story also has a story of failure and struggle to coincide it. Often times we see the result, the overnight success story that took a decade to unfold. Add on to this, those who fell off during the process, those who never got the opportunity despite always being ready, and you will learn about the importance of learning to deal with failure.

A man’s character can often be judged by the cards he has been dealt with and the path that he has decided to take from there on out. Interviewing fighters, coaches, and anyone who has consistently worked on a craft for any significant amount of time, I quickly learned that it was the process of failure and rebirth in their resilient character was born.

There are three circumstances in which you can expect to feel a sense of failure. Learning to use these events to your advantage will serve you great benefit throughout your journey as an athlete.  

 

Learning the Art of Failure | Failing on the First Jump.

The first jump is always a high risk situation [in our minds]. We are walking into unfamiliar territory, the result is unknown, but there’s a reason for why we stand on the edge, all to find out what’s beneath the surface.

The second jump can easily become twice as effective due to its familiarity, adjustments made dependent on the mistakes. Those who do not make mistakes leave with little to review, you have the benefit of information and an emotional attachment to this failure. This attachment helps you to remember that which you never want to feel again; motivation to reach new heights and to set new standards.

There are many cliche sayings to get this point across, but simply put, you have to expect sloppiness in the beginning. In athletic training you learn about what works with your body, even coaches and trainers have a learning process and a time of trial and error when building their relationship with you. Our minds work in beautiful variety and our bodies work by reacting to different stimuli. Failing with this aspect in mind, serves as nothing but forward education.

In my life, failing in the beginning had its repercussions. As a boxer, if you don’t invest in your education [training, studying], the repercussion is severe physical punishment. You are in the spotlight, whether you are an amateur or professional, your failures are highlighted to the masses. These are failures that you never forget, each one of them feels like rock bottom; the second circumstance in which you learn to deal with failure. . . 

 

Hitting rock bottom.

What is rock bottom? Often a combination of multiple failures or negative events in succession to one another.

Making the same mistake twice creates a deeper emotional reaction, becoming beneficial to ingraining a lesson in our minds. Often times we fail again as a repercussion of not dedicating enough of our time to reflecting upon the mistakes that we may have made.

[Que Personal Anecdote]

I was undefeated for my first two years fighting as an amateur, my first loss came when I hit the big show at World Resorts Casino in New York City. In retrospect, I believed that it was a fluke as I got caught going for the finish during a decisive round where I dropped and stunned my opponent multiple times.

Rock bottom. I left my job, sacrificed the health of my relationships, and made an investment by traveling to Thailand; to train under a different perspective and to fix my mistakes. Technically I may have done so, but I didn’t view the failure as a lesson to be learned. I came into the rematch more technically skilled, but not having learned about using failure to my advantage; I came in with the same limiting mindset.

The result was the same. I was TKOd in the same round as the previous fight, all after gaining landing multiple shots in a row and gaining a bit too much confidence.

I have had flashbacks of this moment in at least three fights since, where I feel the same emotions, where I am standing in the same place. But this time I don’t lose, this time I finish with my hand raised.

[Paul Banasiak has been undefeated for 15 straight bouts since this loss, earning multiple National US and World Championship Titles as a member of Team USA]

 

Failure During a Time of Success.

Failing during a time of success is a genuine trial of passion. Some have the ability of reaching this point without failing, whether this is due to educated preparation and avoiding mistakes or by having it “trumply” handed down to them, often times failure without prior trials and tribulations can drop you into a valley so low that it becomes nearly impossible to climb back out.

If you have prior experience with failure, especially if you have insight from the points made earlier, this is only a scratch in your armor. It may be a time to revamp your current plan; motivation for growth and change to avoid complacency and comfort. 

 

A Successful Send Off.

I won’t send you off with cliche quotes, instead, I want you to view the process of training and life from an actionable perspective. Regardless of the circumstance, your ability to deal with failure will become a skill set in itself.

 

Past the Art of Failing. A Modeling Example.

When I first met Jerry [Founder of PNP] and before I began to write for the academy, I instantly felt a sense of openness in conversation with him. It felt like he was always welcoming to new ideas, welcoming to trial and error without emotional attachment to the result.

This piece of information is critically important as I freely write this piece without any external influence. Examples and models can be dissected and studied not only to gain motivation through failure, but as a strategy to learn from the mistakes of others.

I later found out this "openness" all came with reason, I sat down to question Jerry midway through writing this piece to gain more specific insight on his entrepreneurial come up and growth:

“Before PNP became a reality, I was an athlete looking to gain an edge in Soccer and in racing motocross. To do this I researched twenty different cardio/endurance supplements. In the end, I purchased and put about ten to twelve of them to work.  I tried them individually, I combined them and even with research as my blueprint, I didn’t get significant enough results for a long time. . .

I left my job working in foreign exchange in San Francisco, I worked to make ends meet and eventually I even moved out of the Bay Area to be able to afford the launch of something that I was passionate about. . .

This was a personal need that eventually became a global interest. I believe that doing a lot of research in the beginning helped me to fail only four or five times before hitting exactly what I was looking for.

Outside of that, I also researched how the body produces energy during aerobic activity and the different stages it goes through for energy production. Ultimately I got to a point where I felt I knew well enough what the body needs to improve energy production and endurance, as well as which ingredients would help to achieve this result.

That is the point that I started really formulating Cardio Surge Energy. From when I started researching, to when I felt that I had a strong enough formula to have it created, was roughly 12 months in time.

When I first started, I had no idea what I was doing. I started out of curiosity and interest, trail and error [essentially failure] fueled this curiosity for learning and creating. It is all slowly coming full circle.”

This was Jerry’s answer as he now plans to move back to the Bay area with his progressive success. Coming full circle through the art of failure.





Paul Banasiak
Paul Banasiak

Author

Paul Banasiak is a Professional Muay Thai fighter and 2x World Gold Medalist. A former strength and conditioning trainer, boxing coach who is now living, training, and fighting in Thailand. After leaving medical school without looking back, he decided to fully follow his passion of helping others become the best version of themselves by graduating with a health and exercise science degree and creating MuayThaiAthlete.com. A platform for those who are already passionate individuals who want to take their life, mindset & training to the next level.



Also in PNP Academy

Training Stimuli: Managing Volume, Intensity, and Recovery
Training Stimuli: Managing Volume, Intensity, and Recovery

by Christie Leclair June 23, 2017 0 Comments

Properly stimulating your muscles is a precise science and application of volume, intensity and recovery to achieve optimal results. Too much or not enough volume and/or intensity without enough or with too much recovery and you wont get the results you want. In this article we cover how to find the right balance between these three to hit your specific goals.

View full article →

The Most Common Weaknesses In Athletes. . . And How To Fix It!
The Most Common Weaknesses In Athletes. . . And How To Fix It!

by Christie Leclair June 19, 2017 0 Comments

For athletes working to reach their peak potential in performance, there can be a verity of areas that keep them from getting to the high level of performance they’re trying to reach. However the single most common weakness athletes face are weak glutes. In this article we cover how to identify weak glutes, strengthen them and get you on your way to peak athletic performance.

View full article →

Managing Muscle Soreness Post-Workout
Managing Muscle Soreness Post-Workout

by Christie Leclair June 01, 2017 0 Comments

Muscle soreness is something every person who trains deals with. From the beginner to the professional athlete, understanding what post-training muscle soreness is and how to manage it will go a long way in your training, recovery and overall athletic progress. In this article, we what post-training muscle soreness is, what causes it and how to manage it.

View full article →

SIGN UP

TO GET 10% OFF ON YOUR FIRST ORDER, THE LATEST ON NEW RELEASES AND MORE. . .